11 JUL 1989 WORLD POPULATION DAY

World Population Day
11 July

“On this World Population Day, I urge all Governments, businesses and civil society to support and invest in teenage girls. Everyone deserves the benefits of economic growth and social progress. Let us work together to ensure a life of security, dignity and opportunity for all.”

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

teengae girls
© UNFPA/Anra Adhikari

2016 Theme: Investing in teenage girls.

In 1989, the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme recommended that 11 July be observed by the international community as World Population Day, a day to focus attention on the urgency and importance of population issues. This year’s theme is ‘Investing in teenage girls.’

Teenage girls around the world face enormous challenges. Many are considered by their communities or parents to be ready for marriage and motherhood. Many are forced from school, damaging their future prospects. Even among girls who stay in school, access to basic information about their health, human rights and reproductive rights can be hard to come by, leaving them vulnerable to illness, injury and exploitation. These challenges are exacerbated among marginalized girls, such as members of ethnic minorities or those living in poverty or remote areas.

Yet when teenage girls are empowered, when they know about their rights and are given the tools to succeed, they become agents of positive change in their communities.

UNFPA’s programmes aim to end child marriage, curb adolescent pregnancy, and to empower girls to make informed choices about their health and lives. In 2015 alone, UNFPA programmes helped 11.2 million girls between ages 10 and 19 gain access to sexual and reproductive health services and information.

“Leaders and communities must focus on and stand up for the human rights of the most marginalized teenage girls, particularly those who are poor, out of school, exploited, or subjected to harmful traditional practices, including child marriage,” UNFPA Executive Director Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin said. “Marginalized girls are vulnerable to poor reproductive health and more likely to become mothers while still children themselves. They have a right to understand and control their own bodies and shape their own lives.

POPULATIONPOPULATION

POPULATION CONTROVERSY


Population stabilization is controversial, but there are ways to address population that improve people’s lives. We can empower people, improve lives, and protect the Earth and the future of the human race if we approach the population issue correctly. The correct approach is letting people make their own decisions.

Horrors of Coercion
Population interventions based on demographic targets have seen coercive methods in the past, including the forced sterilizations in India in the 1970s and other human rights abuses that continue to surface. PMC acknowledges these for what they are: horrific. PMC does not support coercive approaches to stabilizing population numbers because they are inhumane and unnecessary. There are human rights enhancing ways to contribute toward population stabilization, such as improving the status of women and girls.

Population vs. Consumption
Population is sometimes not seen as part of the problem. Instead, the problem is identified as capitalism, consumerism, or inadequate technology. PMC fully supports the important work being done by other organizations to address over-production and over-consumption. We must lessen excessive ecological footprints wherever they occur, including those of corporations, governments and individuals. However, the equation that leads us to today’s incredible outstripping of the Earth’s resources and ecological impoverishment includes both our socio-economic behaviors and the number of people. We must address both in order to live sustainably. Regardless of how little an individual might consume, or how responsibly a corporation might produce, at some point a large enough population would still outstrip available renewable resources.

Racism
People must question the intentions of groups working to change demographics. PMC relies on demographic data and input from host countries to determine areas of highest need. Because PMC knows that improving human health and human rights lowers fertility rates and improves the lives of individuals, the places with human health and human rights needs are the places where PMC goes to work. We don’t care what your color, creed, or ethnicity is, we want to help improve your opportunities to make informed decisions and live healthy, happy, prosperous lives.

Cultural Respect
Whenever one organization works within a different culture, a tremendous amount of care must be taken. PMC hires all local writers, actors, and production staff to create programs that are culturally sensitive and appropriate. The issues addressed in each program are based on the concerns of the host country, and the values of the program are based on the policies of that country, including the UN agreements to which the country is a signatory. In some programs, in-country staff does address harmful traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation or domestic violence. The staff work hard to think about how to approach the topics and how to spur conversation within the audience. What often results is a realization that “common” and “culture” are not synonymous. Unnecessary death and suffering are not culture and it can’t be justified as such — instead, misinformation is often the culprit.

Economic Growth
Many believe that population growth is necessary for economic growth, which is often the opposite. The real measure of economic welfare is not gross national product (GNP), but GNP per capita. It is clear that individual incomes tend to rise as fertility rates fall. In fact, every country that has been reclassified from developing status to developed status since World War II first started with fertility reduction by promoting family planning and small family norms.

Religious Concerns
Religious perspectives on issues like contraception and reproductive health vary greatly, even within branches of the same religion, but according to DHS surveys, many women cite male opposition, religious opposition, or misinformation as the primary barriers to using contraceptives-not access. In all countries and all religions, it requires examination to know if religion is a barrier to reproductive choice and if religious leaders are opposed or supportive.

Abortion: Right to Life
Some people have moral objections to aborting a pregnancy at any time. PMC believes that women should have the right to choose whether or not to follow through with a pregnancy and that abortion should be legal, safe, and rare. By providing communities with culturally appropriate information and access to contraception and family planning services, the number of women seeking abortions will decrease. We want every child to be a wanted child.

Immigration
Unlike some population organizations, PMC does not work on immigration.

WHY POPULATION IS IMPORTANT


237,211

MORE PEOPLE ARE ADDED TO THE PLANET EVERY DAY.

(Population Reference Bureau)

Every second worldwide, five people are born and two people die, leaving three more humans to inhabit the earth. That’s approximately 180 more people per minute and more than 237,000 more people hungry for dinner each night. How long can Mother Earth provide for this? The world population is 7.2 billion and grows by 80 million a year.

The Global Footprint Network estimates that we are already overusing planetary resources. In terms of renewable resources and the Earth’s capacity to absorb carbon, toxic chemicals, and other forms of pollution, we will need two Earth’s by 2030 to sustain us. Our current growth path is unsustainable. The warning signs are all around us, as rivers and lakes shrink, water tables fall, carbon emissions rise, deserts expand, forests shrink, and fisheries collapse.

Current trends would suggest that we are on our way to becoming a “single-specie” planet. We have already using about half of the world’s land surface to grow our crops, raise livestock, construct our roads, and build our towns and cities. To grow our crops, we are using a land area about the size of South America, and to raise cattle and farm animals we have cleared an area greater than the continent of Africa.

But this trajectory of growth is unnecessary and has simple solutions. It is estimated that 50 percent of the world’s pregnancies are unintended and 25 percent are unwanted. We must protect the rights of girls and women to determine if and when they want to have children. We must work to make mothers, fathers, and children more healthy. These forms of empowerment, enabling choice and expanding information, will change the dangerous trajectory of the world’s population and improve the lives of people around the world.


POPULATION IS PART OF THE SOLUTION


There’s no shortage of information about the many challenges facing our planet, such as climate change, sea levels, food systems, air quality, pollution, and availability of energy sources. But understanding how improving health and human rights of individuals around the world positively impacts these global issues is a key component in solving these issues.

(Number of people) X (consumption) = impact on planet.

PMC’s approach to addressing population revolves around empowerment and individual choice. PMC works on health and human rights issues to improve access to information and improved ability to make choices.

PMC addresses many issues in the categories of health, human rights, and environmental protection. PMC’s primary focus is on women’s health and human rights, such as reproductive health, maternal and child health, family planning,girls’ education, gender equality, child marriage, and gender-based violence.


EMPOWER PEOPLE, IMPACT POPULATION PROJECTIONS


There are human rights and health enhancing ways to stabilize population, such as providing girls with equal rights and an education. We believe that by taking actions that enhance the lives of the people and the planet today, we can protect the lives of the people and the planet of tomorrow. In fact, understanding the currently unsustainable population growth helps lend urgency to these important health and human rights issues.

We use serial dramas, often called soap operas, to reach large audiences with good stories that also contain education and information. Within the serial dramas, we address a number of issues according to these categories:

Human Health
Human Rights
Environmental Protection


POPULATION CONTROVERSY


Population stabilization is controversial, but there are ways to address population that improve people’s lives. We can empower people, improve lives, and protect the Earth and the future of the human race if we approach the population issue correctly. The correct approach is letting people make their own decisions.

Horrors of Coercion
Population interventions based on demographic targets have seen coercive methods in the past, including the forced sterilizations in India in the 1970s and other human rights abuses that continue to surface. PMC acknowledges these for what they are: horrific. PMC does not support coercive approaches to stabilizing population numbers because they are inhumane and unnecessary. There are human rights enhancing ways to contribute toward population stabilization, such as improving the status of women and girls.

Population vs. Consumption
Population is sometimes not seen as part of the problem. Instead, the problem is identified as capitalism, consumerism, or inadequate technology. PMC fully supports the important work being done by other organizations to address over-production and over-consumption. We must lessen excessive ecological footprints wherever they occur, including those of corporations, governments and individuals. However, the equation that leads us to today’s incredible outstripping of the Earth’s resources and ecological impoverishment includes both our socio-economic behaviors and the number of people. We must address both in order to live sustainably. Regardless of how little an individual might consume, or how responsibly a corporation might produce, at some point a large enough population would still outstrip available renewable resources.

Racism
People must question the intentions of groups working to change demographics. PMC relies on demographic data and input from host countries to determine areas of highest need. Because PMC knows that improving human health and human rights lowers fertility rates and improves the lives of individuals, the places with human health and human rights needs are the places where PMC goes to work. We don’t care what your color, creed, or ethnicity is, we want to help improve your opportunities to make informed decisions and live healthy, happy, prosperous lives.

Cultural Respect
Whenever one organization works within a different culture, a tremendous amount of care must be taken. PMC hires all local writers, actors, and production staff to create programs that are culturally sensitive and appropriate. The issues addressed in each program are based on the concerns of the host country, and the values of the program are based on the policies of that country, including the UN agreements to which the country is a signatory. In some programs, in-country staff does address harmful traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation or domestic violence. The staff work hard to think about how to approach the topics and how to spur conversation within the audience. What often results is a realization that “common” and “culture” are not synonymous. Unnecessary death and suffering are not culture and it can’t be justified as such — instead, misinformation is often the culprit.

Economic Growth
Many believe that population growth is necessary for economic growth, which is often the opposite. The real measure of economic welfare is not gross national product (GNP), but GNP per capita. It is clear that individual incomes tend to rise as fertility rates fall. In fact, every country that has been reclassified from developing status to developed status since World War II first started with fertility reduction by promoting family planning and small family norms.

Religious Concerns
Religious perspectives on issues like contraception and reproductive health vary greatly, even within branches of the same religion, but according to DHS surveys, many women cite male opposition, religious opposition, or misinformation as the primary barriers to using contraceptives-not access. In all countries and all religions, it requires examination to know if religion is a barrier to reproductive choice and if religious leaders are opposed or supportive.

Abortion: Right to Life
Some people have moral objections to aborting a pregnancy at any time. PMC believes that women should have the right to choose whether or not to follow through with a pregnancy and that abortion should be legal, safe, and rare. By providing communities with culturally appropriate information and access to contraception and family planning services, the number of women seeking abortions will decrease. We want every child to be a wanted child.

Immigration
Unlike some population organizations, PMC does not work on immigration.


CURRENT WORLD POPULATION

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  1. Population Matters – populationmatters.org‎

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Author: bcp211

BUSINESSMAN AND AGRICULTURIST

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